2015/3/30 10:40:00

On Saturday, February 28, 2015, College Preparatory Professor Domingo took 19 HTIC students and me to participate in a whale watching / whale counting volunteer activity on the Makapuíu Lighthouse trail. It was part of the whale count held held each year by the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuaries (NOAA).

At first I was hesitant about going because we had to meet early in the morning. Also, I am not a fan of hiking unknown areas. Nevertheless, I went, and I am so thankful I did so. The day was beautiful with clear skies and a light rain, although it was really windy. When we reached our spot halfway up the Makapuíu trail, I felt like I was back in my childhood home on Kauai. There we have an amazing view of the ocean, and during whale season, we often sit and watch for whales. At Makapuíu, however, it was better. We were so close to the ocean and could see many sprays from the blowholes of both mothers and calves when they surfaced. There were some awesome breaches, pectoral slaps, tail slaps, and all the other fun things that whales do to let us know they're out there.

I worked together with Prof. Domingo to count the whales, and our tally of the different ways to count the whales added up to between 80-90 whales in the four hours we were out there. This experience re-sparked my passion to take time to sit down, relax, and enjoy whale watching here in the Islands.

Keanna Woodward


2015/1/2 16:01:06

HTIC offers a chance for its students to attend programs in Japan, Korea, and China to study the language and culture of these countries. This program is unique; study abroad is seldom found associated with most A.A. degree programs. The following is from Kara, one of the college's local students currently studying at Tokai University in Japan. Best of luck Kara with the rest of your studies!

"On September 10, 2014, my dream of studying abroad in Japan became a reality. Thanks to HTICís DEA Program, I am now studying the Japanese language, experiencing the culture, and meeting a lot of international students during my six-month stay abroad.

"To my surprise, I tested into the Level 6 foreign exchange student class, which is equivalent to the material sixth and seventh graders learn (in Japan). From Monday to Friday, I attend three 1-Ĺ hour classes where we cover topics such as grammar, kanji, and speaking.

"In the future, I want to become a Japanese language teacher in Hawaii. As a result, I have taken the time to find volunteer services where I can obtain teaching experience and improve my Japanese speaking skills. With the help of advisors, I have become an English language tutor and a guest Hawaii culture lecturer at a few events. When I can catch a breather, I also explore the nearby area with the many Japanese and international friends I have made here. So far, I have seen the natural wonders of Hakone, the many temples of Kamakura, and the busy city life of Yokohama. With a busy schedule like mine, itís no wonder three months have flown by so quickly!"

--Kara N.


2015/1/2 11:02:16

The Office of Student Services at HTIC has launched a new website for students (http://htic-oss.weebly.com/). The site's home page is divided into four sections: Admissions, Academics, Student Life, and Career.

Under "Admissions," prospective students can find information about HTIC, the application process, tuition & fees, financial aid, and how to enter the United States. "Academics" provides information on the different types of study programs and courses that HTIC offers, including the College Preparatory Program, the Liberal Arts Program, and the Discover East Asia Study Abroad Program.

In the "Student Life" section, current students will find useful tips on living in Hawaii, including information pertaining to banking, transportation, health, housing, and activities. Finally, the "Career" section is a great resource for students preparing to transfer to a four-year university or work after graduating from HTIC.

Please check out this new website and feel free to contact a staff member in the Office of Student Services if you have any questions.


2015/1/2 11:02:00

The Office of Student Services held another Transfer Workshop for students in October to help HTIC graduates through the transfer process. Even your first term as a Liberal Arts student is not too soon to start thinking about what you want to do after graduating from HTIC. Students should start early in researching schools, talking with advisors, and establishing a post-graduation plan.

The following are recent HTIC alums currently attending the University of Oregon and Minnesota State University, Mankato.


Name: Kohei (on left)
Hometown: Hyogo, Japan
Major/Minor: Business Administration/Economics
Reason for attending UO: Good business school

Name: Sumire (second from left)
Hometown: Chiba, Japan
Major/Minor: Economics/Business
Reason for attending UO: Safety, environment, major

Name: Shiori (third from left)
Hometown: Kanagawa. Japan
Major/Minor: Linguistics
Reason for attending UO: University transfer agreement with HTIC, major

Name: Yusuke (on right)
Hometown: Tokyo, Japan
Major/Minor: Business Administration (Sports Marketing)
Reason for attending UO: One of the best sports marketing schools in the U.S.



Name: Kenshi (on left)
Hometown: Tokyo, Japan
Major/Minor: International Business

Name: Keisuke (second from left)
Hometown: Tokyo, Japan
Major/Minor: Sports Management

Name: Masaya (third from left)
Hometown: Saga, Japan
Major/Minor: International Relations

Name: Mako (on right)
Hometown: Kyoto, Japan
Major/Minor: Mass Media

As these students continue to work hard to achieve their dreams, their advice for current HTIC students is to "study hard!" One student offers the following words of wisdom: "Think carefully about your next step. Try to choose the school that fits your career. If you have time between your HTIC AA-degree graduation and the start of your BA/BS program at your next school, think about doing an internship to gain experience."


2014/9/2 10:13:34

The History of the Hawaiian Islands class (HIST 284) went on a field trip to downtown Honolulu last week to explore both historical and contemporary Hawaiʻi politics and history. They first visited ʻIolani Palace to explore the Hawaiian Kingdom past and witness this sacred site that was home to the Aliʻi. After taking a tour of the Palace, the next visit was to observe part of a current and on-going court case, one that is highlighting the fact that state legislators should live in the area that they represent. Both of these visits brought to life the course work that we have been studying this summer session.


(1) 2 3 4 ... 26 »